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Transport Fever 2 Review: Where’s the Beef

Transport Fever 2 Review: Where’s the Beef
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Do you have a fever for transportation? Do you want to scratch your head in anger over why the train isn’t making a full loop around the track you just placed, only to realize later on that you missed a single space of track? Then Transport Fever 2 is the game for you! From a horse-drawn carriage to self-driving e-trucks, Transport Fever 2 lets you build your own transportation empire!

As good as this game is, I’m not sure I can comfortably say it is a good game. It doesn’t feel like a lot of gameplay, but there is lots of room for doing what you just did again and figuring out how to do it better. Which is nice, but the ratios seem weirder than other transportation games. I’m used to putting down one or two vehicles on a route and letting them do their things for a few years. With Transport Fever 2, it felt like anything less than three vehicles on one route would lead to bankruptcy. I played mostly sandbox mode, the true way to experience games like this, and was able to build a 100 million dollar company shortly after getting the ratios down. 

But no multiplayer, which honestly takes a lot of fun out of it I feel. The graphics are good, and do give the game a more inviting look and feel. I think one of the reasons I wasn’t able to switch back to OpenTTD was knowing how prettier and easier to control Transport Fever 2 was in comparison. I did notice that goods between cities weren’t a thing, which might have been why Transport Fever 2 felt empty at first glance. What was nice, is that the factory and raw material sites grew with nearby towns and their need for goods, meaning more goods needing to be transported and thus more effective lines to be set up. This is where the only true issue I had with this game came up; as the map became more and more productive and populated, the game seemed to get a little bit less stable as time went on. This may be a personal experience, as I only have one computer to test on. Part of the problem could also be the in-game clock; as the later in time the game gets, the more issues with auto-saving it seems to have. A great trade-off for this is the awesome achievement you can get for playing up until the real-world time. That made me smile and have a good laugh. 

The gorgeous streets in Transport Fever 2

The ratios for trucks to goods to lines are crazy important in this game. Just for the heck of it, I made a massive train that connected all the towns on the map; and it had a loss of 3 million dollars a year. Boats were great for getting things from one end of the map to the other but they were so slow that maintenance fees stacked up and made them a loss of money as well. Short distance trains and truck systems of any size, never seemed to give me an issue. Planes worked wonders as well, but the pollution was so bad, that putting them near a town could bring its growth to grinding halt. Overall, learning how to correctly use a method of transporting stuff or people seems to play a big role in this game, but once you get over the learning curve, it’s totally worth it. 

I would recommend this game for people that want an easy-going transportation simulator. Its campaign mode is a one hundred percent beginner friendly and teaches you the ins and outs of setting up your company. If you are looking for more of an intense massive transportation system building game, I’d recommend waiting until a multiplayer update comes out for it. But overall, Transport Fever 2 will scratch that itch you have for a transportation simulator. And if you want to see more content like this article, be sure to follow Mammoth Gamers on Twitter and Facebook, for all your gaming and tech needs!

7.2
Good

The Good

  • Beautiful graphics that give the game a wonderful modern look
  • The game grows with the user's inputs
  • Creative Campaign mode ideas keep things engaging

The Bad

  • No multiplayer makes the world feel empty
  • Towns feel like black holes sucking in goods, not producing anything

When Jonathan isn't playing video games or cooking, he is writing poetry and computer code. He enjoys PC gaming, but won't let go of his roots in handheld and console gaming. If it isn't his PlayStation 4 or Vita, then it is his Nintendo 3DS or GameBoy Advance. He also enjoys a good Billy Collins poem, while enjoying some homemade caramel.